early armhouse sillstones came from splitting boulders or surface ledge:  these were all from surface, exposed ledge in 19th century.

Inventory

early armhouse sillstones came from splitting boulders or surface ledge: these were all from surface, exposed ledge in 19th century.
stoneyard layout using driveway stabilization fabric & wooden dunnage;
stocking steps and posts
long foundation sills are rare
These would make good wall caps, or accents in a wall. Some are smooth enough for steps. Approximately 40 available.
Old gateposts, foundation sills, brownstone landings, well covers, wellworn Grantville terrace pieces, Norfolk posts
4 corners of building; 3 fascia or cladding pieces
W. Simsbury, Bristol, Chicopee Falls
one is signed, dated
some have holes through-and-through, some have 1828 Grantville pieces are footworn smooth, others are architectural pieces with finished/bush-hammered detailing.
Some have holes through-and-through, others are footworn smooth Grantville quarry pieces from 1828; 2 bollards in back were already recycled pieces in 1898 - found in a wall of the Torrington RR Station on Water St. in 2011 during demolition.
19th century: many pieces were not from quarries, they were hand-split from exposed ledge on farms to build houses, barns, and fences.